.45-70!

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Copper BB
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2011 8:03 pm
This among other firearms is something I really want! What a great lookin gun! To big for a pack gun though...

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PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 10:25 am
The .45-70 is on my list too!
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 10, 2011 3:19 pm
Dude, I've been researching that .45-70 cartridge!

Holy Smokes!!! Everything I'm finding says it hits like a freight train! Historically, after the Sandy Hook trials of 1879, a heavier 500 gr. bullet was selected, and the round was used for long range (like 3300 yards) volley fire. The tests showed the round hitting nose first (3) 1" oak boards and then into the sand! Accuracy to within a 6' x 6' area was the accepted norm, though some very skilled marksmen were deadly accurate at closer ranges.

The .45-70 has alo been used to hunt Africas "Big 6", from bird to elephant. Its also used in North America for bear and buffalo.

I think its more than I "need" in any circumstance, but some states are allowing the Handi-Rifle to be used during "primitive gun season" which used to be black powder and muzzle loaders only. The catch is that it specifies using a caliber = to or greater than .38, so if its the Handi-Rifle it means moving up to the .45-70! ;)
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2011 5:51 pm
The first Gatling guns were chambered for that caliber...as were most buffalo rifles on the plains of the Old West !!
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2011 9:18 pm
Interesting! I knew about the buffalo guns, but not the Gatling.
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 08, 2012 4:59 pm
Rossignol wrote:This among other firearms is something I really want! What a great lookin gun! To big for a pack gun though...

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That's exactly the one I bought. I'm an enthusiast of guns of the old west, and could never in a million years be able to afford a Sharps, not even an Italian copy.
The H&R Buffalo Classic likewise was out of my reach, but the New England Firearms Handi Rifle was able to happen.
I named her Big Mama Thump. I'm going to have to learn to reload because it's about $2 per trigger squeeze. :o
So far I have shot Black Hills 405 grain lead flatnose, and Remington 300 grain JHP. It doesn't kick as bad as one might think, about like a 12 ga Pardner.
I put a leather sling on her to use as a shooting aid when firing offhand, and a nylon butt cuff that holds 9 spare rounds. I really want one of those lace-on leather shell holders, give the Ol' Gal some class.
"There is nothing so exhilarating as to be shot at without result."
Winston Churchill
Member: Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion, Vietnam Veterans of America, AMVETS, Society of the 5th Infantry Division

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 12, 2012 11:23 am
I've wanted a .45-70 single shot or lever rifle for the longest time.

Having already owned a couple of Handi-Rifles (and been extremely pleased with them) it stands to reason that I should get a Handi in .45-70!!!
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 2:52 pm
Only .45-70 I own is one bullet...I picked it up for my collection at a gun show.

I would not want anyone to even throw that thing at me, let alone shoot it !!
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PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2016 12:11 am
I am still without a .45-70 rifle but am definitely searching for one in a HandiRifle configuration.

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